Are we really clever than a lab or forest monkey?

monkey2

If we just look into two fields of human history, I think we are not clever than a lab or forest monkey. These fields are chess and world peace. Let’s look that fields briefly.

Chess: We played SP#518 for centuries, and we ignored other 959 starting positions completely.

World peace: A 2014 report published in the journal Earth’s Future found that even a regional war of 100 nuclear detonations would produce 5 teragrams of black soot (that’s 5,000,000,000 kg!) that would rise up to Earth’s stratosphere and block sunlight. This would produce a sudden drop in global temperatures that could last longer than 25 years and temporarily destroy much of the Earth’s protective ozone layer. This could also cause as much as an 80% increase in UV radiation on Earth’s surface and destroy both land and sea-based ecosystems, potentially leading to global nuclear famine.

Michael Mills, an atmospheric scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colorado and the study’s lead author, summarized it best: “In the 1980s, we learned that global thermonuclear war could render the planet close to uninhabitable. Now, we know that even [regional] nuclear war can cause great suffering worldwide, with potential for a lot of people to die from starvation in regions very far from a conflict.”

So, are we clever than a lab or forest monkey if we count above two fields of human journey: chess and world peace?

In other words, if chess and world peace depends on monkey intelligence instead of human intelligence, would we return back to real chess and would we live in a safer world without nuclear weapons? Just askin’ don’t take it too seriously.

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“Hey Bent, lets play real chess again.” R.J. Fischer

fischerlarsenchess959

I wrote following message when I play a Fischer chess game in Weekly Chess960 Arena on Lichess. “Now we’re playing real chess again. Thanks Robert James Fischer.” I wrote this message because I really feel I’m playing real chess again and I enjoyed it and almost all players I played against in this week chess960 arena on lichess feel the same thing. This is amazing: finding players who enjoy to play real chess again. And after that I started brainstorming about what if Bent Larsen joined Fischer’s ideas and what if they started a worldwide movement about to play a real chess again without SP#518. I’m 100% sure we would be live in a world better than today. When you play real chess you have no time to make dirty wars! And yes all is connected all. When you start polluting the nature, you start collect more money, more weapons and guess what: start killing each other to get more money and more weapons. And this deadly scenario will repeat itself until Nuclear winter comes and do its job bigger and faster, and most probably deadlier.

So, Fischer failed to start a worldwide movement about to play a real pure chess again. He failed not because he wasn’t a big fighter. He was one of the biggest fighter in total chess history. He failed, because he didn’t try to get Larsen, Keres, or any other real chess professional to his side and increase the powerbase of the movement. The same scenario still exist today. I won’t name the name of today’s Fischer (ok a small hint: He is a Russian GM and he really understand what is Fischer chess and its capability to get back real chess). He is doing the same mistake as Fischer already done: go alone and fight against the stupidity alone. There is a good quote about it: “Never argue with an idiot; they’ll drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” So these idiots won against R.J. Fischer. But they won’t win this time. We’re better equipped now: we have the internet and in a matter of clicks we can play real chess again and once we really enjoyed to play real chess, we can connect together and start a worldwide movement to beat chess mafia. We can do it and we’ll do it. Just after the nuclear winter I guess, unfortunately :(

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One dedicated player is enough to play real chess again!

onededicated

The problem is there is none such player in professional chess world today. Bobby Fischer was such a dedicated player and lived his final years in total desperation about the enigma of dark guys and their evil intentions about blocking the real chess demand from professional chess players. Still nowadays, this blockade exist and very well structured and supported by crude oil-computer oligarchs. I won’t write a very long and detailed blog post about the current terrible situations on world peace and an its amazing connection to the need of real chess demand. Today, I have more and more information about these dark guys who systematically destroyed Fischer’s brilliant idea about returning back to the good old days about the tournament chess play. My recent terrible experience about the ongoing war on Middle East gave me an extraordinary reasoning(or a vision) about why Fischer failed to popularize Fischer Chess (chess960). He failed because he didn’t meet/find a single dedicated chess player like himself. Now he passed away and there is no such dedicated chess player like Fischer to make people to realize they are not playing chess but overplaying a chess variant also called #518. I myself as a very amateur chess player maybe a patzer tried to play real chess with titled chess players by using a very dirty instrument called money. Yes, maybe I succeed better than Fischer about the popularization of real chess also known as Fischer random chess, FRC, chess960. But still I failed to create a Europe-wide chess959 movement due to some unexpected family problems plus the negative change of living conditions because of dirty politics and world peace. But I’m not totally resigned from my job as a keen fighter of fair chess play. One thing I’m so sure from my good and bad experiences on current world politics and chess: People will destroy the bad guys on chess and they will do this with a fashion. Time will verify my optimistic claim. Just watch it: One day some professional chess player in this tiny planet really understand he/she played just a chess variant (#518) and he/she will start to play real chess again. And once this special moment starts, it can’t be stopped by neither oligarchs nor evil-minded dark guys not because of dark guys weakened or failed, because of a desire to play real chess by a chess professional. It is unstoppable and very soon…

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We need clean air, oops sorry clean chess!

carpollution

Nowadays super-duper computer-invaded chess#518 world represents old cars make air pollution worse. Lets dig car industry a bit and compare it with current active chess community and its profiteers. Well, in car industry the biggest profiteers are oil producers, because in order to start a car engine you need fuel. So, more and more cars built with the support of oil producing countries and its allies for the last 100 years if not more. In late 1960’s and early 1970’s when someone talk about the possibility of an electric cars they either killed or bribed and join the community. Very similar situation is currently going on in chess world even nowadays. With the support of the computer industry (read it oil producers in car industry), new players join this ugly super-duper computerized/memorized chess community with their fancy databases and silicons. 20 years passed after Bobby Fischer introduced chess960 to the world chess community. After that time just like in car industry, chess960 supporters either killed (of course I don’t have any proof, call me conspiracy theorist or sort of) or bribed and became silent until death. When did you last time hear Valery Salov?

Just like fossil-fuel based cars have no future, chess#518 have no future at all. We need clean chess just like clean air! Let me tell you something serious: You can’t/won’t breathe clean air with all the oil oligarchs alive and well-motivated for more profits. Just like Greenpeace, chess world needs NGO’s to resist against chess tyranny and oligarchy. Without resistance and well-prepared plan, players will continue to play chess518 until the declaration of chess is totally solved. Even after this late-declaration, I suspect majority of players will still continue to play it. What a beautiful world we currently live in?!

Another false argument about non-popularity of chess960 even after 20 years of public announcement by Fischer himself, is about the non-existence of a tournament organizers and sponsors. Let me repeat again: “They won’t come and start to organize a big chess960 tournament unless computer industry allow them. And chess software and databases are still very profitable business together with the coaching stuff (read it opening preparation)”. And more important, just like oil producers can’t support electric cars manufacturers, so the computer industry won’t support real chess (a.k.a chess960, a better word would be chess959). It is a miracle that when all the fossil-fuel based cars removed from the streets, and more and more clean cars seen on the street, it will be the time that we also see more and more chess959 players will play this wonderful game called chess. Future is bright. Take your position now! Tomorrow will be too late for you.

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Fischer Madness Marathon on Lichess server

Fischer Madness Marathon started on Lichess server today. Chess959 proudly sponsored this interesting huge marathon with total 960 hours of playing (this is the longest marathon ever held in Lichess by the way). Here is the t-shirt reward for all players who collects at least 2,000 marathon points in 160 rounds with 6 hours of each sessions/rounds:

fischer

In addition to this lovely t-shirt reward, there is also cash prizes to first 10 players of this long marathon. More than 1,000 Lichess players already interested to join this tough marathon. In addition to Lichess engine detection system for cheats (which is very good if it compared with the industry standards), Chess959 also use very unique system to catch multiple accounts and engine cheaters. Everyday at least two rounds will be played, players may join anytime, can withdraw the sessions/rounds at any time, take a nap, then join again later with all points intact. Motto is simple: Collect as much as possible points from all of these 160 rounds.

Current Standings

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#84, 85 Grigoriants, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2564 vs Tratar, Marko (GM) FIDE: 2468

#84 Grigoriants, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2564 vs Tratar, Marko (GM) FIDE: 2468

Chess960 start position: 140 (NBRQNKBR)

Time control: 25+10

Site: http://en.lichess.org/ZgtPxJBs

SP140

1. c4 c6 2. d4 d5 3. Nf3 f6 4. Bf5 e6 5. Bd3 Nb6 6. c5 Nd7 7. Nb3 f5 8. h3 Nef6 9. Bh2 Bxh2 10. Rxh2 Qc7 11. Qd2 Ne4 12. Qa5 Qb8 13. g4 Bf7 14. Rg2 O-O 15. Nh4 f4 16. Qe1 Rce8 17. Nd2 Qd8 18. Nhf3 Bg6 19. Ne5 Nxe5 20. dxe5 Nxd2+ 21. Qxd2 Qg5 22. Bxg6 hxg6 23. Qc3 f3 24. Rg3 d4 25. Qc4 fxe2+ 26. Ke1 Qf4 { White resigns } 0-1


#84 Tratar, Marko (GM) FIDE: 2468 vs Grigoriants, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2564

Chess960 start position: 140 (NBRQNKBR)

Time control: 25+10

Site: http://en.lichess.org/Z0aLb9rJ

SP140

1. c4 c6 2. f3 f6 3. Bf2 Bf7 4. Nb3 Kg8 5. d4 Nb6 6. Na5 Nd6 7. Bd3 Na8 8. b4 b6 9. Nb3 b5 10. c5 Nc4 11. Rb1 Nc7 12. e4 g6 13. Nc2 Kg7 14. Qc1 d6 15. O-O Ne6 16. Rd1 d5 17. Bg3 Bxg3 18. hxg3 h5 19. exd5 cxd5 20. Ne3 h4 21. gxh4 Rxh4 22. g3 Rh5 23. Bf1 Qc7 24. Kf2 Rh2+ 25. Bg2 Ng5 26. Nf1 Nh3+ { White resigns } 0-1

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#82, 83 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

#82 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

Chess960 start position: 687 (QRKNNRBB)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/8Lb8rZcz

SP687

1. f4 f5 2. g3 g6 3. Nc3 Nc6 4. Nf3 e5 5. fxe5 Nxe5 6. Nxe5 Bxe5 7. e4 a5 8. exf5 O-O-O 9. O-O-O gxf5 10. d4 Bg7 11. a4 Nd6 12. Nd5 Qa6 13. Qa3 Rfe8 14. Qc5 Bxd5 15. Bxd5 Re2 16. Bf3 Re7 17. Rfe1 Rde8 18. Rxe7 Rxe7 19. Bf2 Kb8 20. Kb1 Qa7 21. Qd5 Qb6 22. Rd3 Ka7 23. Rb3 Qa6 24. Qc5+ Kb8 25. Rb5 b6 26. Qd5 Re8 27. Ka2 Nxb5 28. axb5 Qa7 29. Qxd7 Rg8 30. Qf7 Rd8 31. Qxg7 a4 32. Qe7 Rc8 33. Qd7 a3 34. b4 Rf8 35. Be3 Rc8 36. Bf4 Qa4 37. Qc6 Qa7 38. h3 Rd8 39. Bxc7+ { Black resigns } 1-0


 

#83 Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250 vs Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337

Chess960 start position: 687 (QRKNNRBB)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/wI35q1YD

SP687

1. f4 g6 2. e4 Nc6 3. Nf3 a5 4. Nc3 Qa6 5. O-O-O a4 6. d4 f5 7. e5 Bc4 8. Rfe1 e6 9. Kb1 Bd5 10. g3 Ne7 11. Nxd5 exd5 12. b3 Ng7 13. Qb2 Ne6 14. Bg2 c6 15. Bf1 b5 16. b4 Kc7 17. c3 Nc8 18. Be3 Nb6 19. h3 Bg7 20. Qd2 Bh6 21. Bd3 Rf7 22. Re2 Rg8 23. Rg1 Qc8 24. Rf2 Qf8 25. Rgf1 Qe7 26. Nh2 Rgf8 27. g4 Nc4 28. Bxc4 bxc4 29. gxf5 Rxf5 30. Ng4 Qh4 31. Qd1 Bxf4 32. Qxa4 Bxe3 33. Qa7+ Kd8 34. Qb8+ Ke7 35. Qd6+ Ke8 36. Rxf5 gxf5 37. Nxe3 Qxh3 38. Re1 Qg3 39. Re2 Qf3 40. Re1 f4 41. Nc2 Qg2 42. b5 cxb5 43. Nb4 Qd2 44. Rc1 f3 45. Nxd5 Qg5 46. Nf6+ Rxf6 47. exf6 Qxf6 48. Rg1 f2 49. Rf1 Qf5+ 50. Kb2 Qf3 51. Qb8+ Ke7 52. Qe5 d6 53. Qxb5 Qe2+ 54. Ka3 Qxf1 55. Qb7+ Kf6 56. Qf3+ Kg5 57. Qg3+ Kf5 58. Qf3+ Nf4 59. Qe3 Qe1 { White resigns } 0-1

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#80, 81 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

#80 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

Chess960 start position: 407 (RQBNNKRB)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/uJQLnUW3

SP407

1. d4 c5 2. dxc5 Qxh2 3. g3 d6 4. cxd6 Nxd6 5. Bf3 Nc6 6. c3 Bf5 7. e4 Bh3+ 8. Bg2 Bxg2+ 9. Nxg2 Ne5 10. Ne1 Qh3+ 11. Ke2 O-O-O 12. b3 g6 13. Qc2 f5 14. exf5 gxf5 15. Bf4 Ng6 16. Bxd6 Rxd6 17. Nf3 f4 18. Nb2 Rgd8 19. Nd4 Bxd4 20. cxd4+ Kb8 21. Nc4 Rxd4 22. Rad1 Qe6+ { White resigns } 0-1


 

#81 Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250 vs Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337

Chess960 start position: 407 (RQBNNKRB)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/CTYSoLV7

SP407

1. c4 Nf6 2. O-O O-O 3. g3 c5 4. Nd3 d6 5. b4 cxb4 6. Nxb4 Be6 7. Ne3 Qc7 8. Bb2 Nc6 9. Nbd5 Bxd5 10. Nxd5 Nxd5 11. Bxd5 Rab8 12. Rc1 e6 13. Bg2 Rfc8 14. h4 Qb6 15. Bc3 Qc5 16. e3 Qh5 17. Qb5 Qg4 18. Qb2 Qxc4 19. Bxg7 Bxg7 20. Qxg7+ Kxg7 21. Rxc4 Na5 22. Rg4+ Kf6 23. Be4 h6 24. Rf4+ Ke7 25. Bd3 Rc5 26. Rb1 b6 27. Kg2 Rbc8 28. g4 Rd5 29. Ba6 Rc2 30. d4 Nc4 31. Kg3 Ra5 32. Bxc4 Rxc4 33. Rb2 b5 34. h5 b4 35. f3 f6 36. Re4 Rb5 37. Rf4 a5 38. Kf2 a4 39. Ke2 b3 40. axb3 Rxb3 41. Ra2 a3 42. d5 Rxf4 43. exf4 Rb2+ 44. Rxb2 axb2 { White resigns } 0-1

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#78, 79 Volkov, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2611 vs Deviatkin, Andrei (GM) FIDE: 2508

#78 Volkov, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2611 vs Deviatkin, Andrei (GM) FIDE: 2508

Chess960 start position: 707 (BRKQNNRB)

Time control: 45+10

Site: http://en.lichess.org/DdT2CuuN

SP707

1. d4 d5 2. g4 g6 3. Qd3 b6 4. O-O-O Nd6 5. b3 Ne6 6. Kb1 c6 7. Nd2 Qc7 8. e3 c5 9. c4 dxc4 10. Nxc4 Bxh1 11. Rxh1 Nxc4 12. Qxc4 cxd4 13. exd4 O-O 14. d5 Qxc4 15. bxc4 Nc5 16. Bxh8 Kxh8 17. Nd3 Rfc8 18. Rhe1 Rb7 19. Ne5 Kg7 20. Nc6 e6 21. f4 b5 22. cxb5 Rxb5+ 23. Ka1 Rc7 24. Nd4 Rb6 25. dxe6 Nxe6 26. Nxe6+ Rxe6 27. Rxe6 fxe6 28. g5 h6 29. h4 hxg5 30. hxg5 { Draw } 1/2-1/2


 

#79 Deviatkin, Andrei (GM) FIDE: 2508 vs Volkov, Sergey (GM) FIDE: 2611

Chess960 start position: 707 (BRKQNNRB)

Time control: 45+10

Site: http://en.lichess.org/PrBMmdG7

SP707

1. e4 b5 2. g3 g6 3. d4 d6 4. Ne3 Nf6 5. f3 N8d7 6. b3 e6 7. Nd3 Qe7 8. Qd2 O-O 9. O-O c5 10. dxc5 Nxc5 11. Nxc5 dxc5 12. Rbd1 Rfd8 13. Qa5 h5 14. Be5 Rbc8 15. Qxb5 Nd5 16. Nxd5 exd5 17. Bxh8 Kxh8 18. exd5 Bxd5 19. Rfe1 Qf6 20. f4 Bxh1 21. Kxh1 h4 22. Rxd8+ Qxd8 23. Qd3 Qa5 24. Re3 Qxa2 25. gxh4 Qa1+ 26. Kg2 Qd4 27. Kg3 Kg7 28. Qe4 a5 29. h5 gxh5 30. Qe5+ f6 31. Qxd4 cxd4 32. Rd3 Rxc2 33. Rxd4 Rc3+ 34. Kh4 Kg6 35. Rd5 Rf3 36. Rxh5 f5 37. Rg5+ Kf6 38. Rg3 Rxf4+ 39. Kh5 Rb4 40. Rg6+ Ke5 41. Ra6 Rb5 42. Kg5 Ke4 43. h4 Kf3 44. h5 f4+ 45. Kh4 Kg2 46. h6 Rxb3 47. Rxa5 Rh3+ 48. Kg4 Rxh6 49. Ra2+ Kh1 50. Kxf4 { Draw } 1/2-1/2

 

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#76, 77 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

#76 Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337 vs Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250

Chess960 start position: 468 (RBBNNKRQ)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/ilomcwrr

SP468

1. c4 c5 2. b3 g6 3. Bb2 Be5 4. Nc3 Ne6 5. e3 Nd6 6. f4 Bf6 7. Nf3 b5 8. cxb5 Nxb5 9. Be4 Rb8 10. Rc1 Nxc3 11. Bxc3 Ba6+ 12. Kf2 O-O 13. g4 Rfd8 14. Ba5 d5 15. Bb1 Rd7 16. h4 d4 17. Qh2 dxe3+ 18. dxe3 c4 19. f5 Rf8 20. fxe6 fxe6 21. Qh3 Be5 22. g5 Rd6 23. Be4 c3 24. Rgd1 Re8 25. h5 Qg7 26. hxg6 hxg6 27. Rh1 Rf8 28. Kg2 Be2 29. Nxe5 { Black forfeits on time } 1-0

 


#77  Gombac, Jan (FM) FIDE: 2250 vs Grabinsky, Aaron (NM) FIDE: 2337

Chess960 start position: 468 (RBBNNKRQ)

Time control: 15+5

Site: http://en.lichess.org/9SH1sKFm

SP468

1. c4 b6 2. d4 g6 3. Bh6+ Ng7 4. Be4 c6 5. Nc3 f5 6. Bd3 Nf7 7. Bd2 e5 8. dxe5 Nxe5 9. Nf3 O-O 10. O-O-O Ne6 11. h4 Ng4 12. Rdf1 Bb7 13. h5 c5 14. Nd5 Bxd5 15. cxd5 Nd4 16. e3 Nxf3 17. gxf3 Ne5 18. Bc2 Nc4 19. Bc3 Be5 20. hxg6 hxg6 21. Rxg6+ Kf7 22. Qxh8 Rxh8 23. Bxf5 Rh5 24. Bc2 Rah8 25. Rfg1 Rh1 26. f4 Rxg1+ 27. Rxg1 Bxc3 28. bxc3 Rh2 29. Rf1 d6 30. Bd3 Na5 31. Kd2 c4 32. Bc2 Nb7 33. Ke2 Nc5 34. Rg1 b5 35. Rb1 a6 36. Ra1 Rh5 37. e4 Rh4 38. Ke3 Rh3+ 39. Ke2 Rxc3 40. Kd2 Rf3 41. e5 Rxf4 42. e6+ Kf6 43. Ke3 Rh4 44. Rg1 Rh3+ 45. f3 Rh5 46. Rg6+ Ke7 47. Rg7+ Kf8 48. Rf7+ Ke8 49. Bg6 Re5+ 50. Kd4 Nxe6+ 51. dxe6 Rxe6 52. Rf6+ Ke7 53. Rxe6+ Kxe6 54. Be4 a5 55. Bc6 b4 56. Kxc4 Ke5 57. Kb5 Kd4 58. Kxa5 Kc5 59. Be8 d5 60. Ka4 d4 61. Bb5 { Black resigns } 1-0

 

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